Friday, December 24, 2010

Google picked me

I got home yesterday to see a good size box waiting for me. I figured it was a few last minute gifts I had ordered from Amazon. To my surprise, it was a Chrome OS CR-48. I had applied a few weeks back and never heard anything form Google, so it just arriving at my door was a pleasant surprise. I am sure over the coming months I will be posting more on Chrome OS but here are some of my initial thoughts.

I have been using the CR-48 for about a day now and I am finding that in general I really like it. Having an always connected long battery life laptop seems to fit right into my life. Chrome OS provides a great experience on sub-notebooks that other operating systems such as Windows tend to miss. Sub-notebooks tend to be fairly underpowered when compared to full laptops. This means that even power users are in reality unable to do much on their sub-notebooks besides surf the web. Since Chrome OS specializes in this over Windows, it makes Chrome OS the perfect operating system for sub-notebooks.

At this point Chrome OS is very rough around the edges. Flash is the biggest draw back on the CR-48. When you have a web site that is heavy in Flash, it causes the whole computer to run sluggish. I suppose this is to be expected, flash has never worked well under Linux. I am sure Google will push Adobe to fix this before official release. Plus it will mean that Linux will finally get a decent version of Flash.

The coolest thing about the CR-48 is the concept. Chrome OS commoditizes the PC. When a user picks up a Chrome OS PC they don't think what is under the hood. The user just knows that they will be able to do whatever task they wanted to do. What is even cooler is that the laptop doesn't even need to be owned by that user. The user's preferences and  data will just be there as soon as they login.

I am glad that Google is going about this revolution of the PC in an open manner. They are not trying to be the ultimate authority when it comes to what is on your PC or what you can do with it, as Apple would do. They are releasing the operating system as open source software, unlike what Microsoft would do. I think of all companies Google is the best suited to lead this revolution.